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Rare video shows last surviving member of Amazonian tribe

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Rare video shows last surviving member of Amazonian tribe

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WATCH Video captures last-known member of Amazon tribe in Brazil

Rare video released from a government agency in Brazil shows footage of a lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe who has been living alone for 22 years.

The Guaporé Ethno-Environmental Protection Front has been monitoring the man and, without ever speaking to him, has been helping to ensure that he is protected from all external threats, according to Fundação Nacional do Índio, or FUNAI, a Brazilian government agency that protects the interests and culture of natives to the country.

The video, taken from afar, shows a shaky image of the man hacking at a tree with an ax in Tanaru, an indigenous territory surrounded by private farms and deforested clearings in the Brazilian state of Rondonia.

PHOTO: The lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe has been living alone for 22 years. FUNAI
The lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe has been living alone for 22 years.
PHOTO: Images show the lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe, according to FUNAI, a Brazilian government agency that protects the interests of nativesFUNAI
Images show the lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe, according to FUNAI, a Brazilian government agency that protects the interests of natives

The man appears to be nearly naked in photos released by the agency. He appears to wear a mustache in a close-up frame of his face, a third of which is hidden behind some leaves.

(MORE: Tribe Emerges From Brazilian Jungle, Possibly for 1st Time)

Another images shows a hut where the tribe apparently lived, with a thatched roof made with local vegetation.

PHOTO: A straw house known as maloca, which was built by the lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe, according to FUNAI, a Brazilian government agency that protects the interests of natives.Acervo/Funai
A straw house known as "maloca," which was built by the lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe, according to FUNAI, a Brazilian government agency that protects the interests of natives.

In the 1980s, the establishment of farms and illegal logging in Rondonia led to repeated attacks on the indigenous people living there, according to FUNAI.

The man in the video is thought to be the only survivor after farmers attacked a group of six in 1995, FUNAI said. The agency has been monitoring the man since 1996, but attempts to contact him — the last of which was made in 2005 — were not successful, the agency said.

He has made it clear that he does not want to be contacted, the BBC reported, adding that the agency has a policy of avoiding contact with isolated groups.

PHOTO: Images show the lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe, according to FUNAI, a Brazilian government agency that protects the interests of natives.FUNAI
Images show the lone survivor of an Amazonian tribe, according to FUNAI, a Brazilian government agency that protects the interests of natives.

A Brazilian law allows protection actions to be carried out on land outside the boundaries of indigenous lands when isolated indigenous peoples roam them, FUNAI said. The people who assist him leave only a few tools and seeds for him to plant in places he passes often, FUNAI said.

The video was shot to prove that he is alive in order to renew the restriction order, according to the BBC.

(MORE: Jungle Journey: Living With an Isolated Amazon Tribe)

In 2012, FUNAI registered crops of maize, potatoes, bananas and papayas planted by indigenous people, who live off the food and animals they hunt.

The man is in his 50s but not much else is known about him, the BBC reported. In Brazil, he has been dubbed "the hole Indian" or the "Indian of the hole" because he usually leaves behind large holes or ditches, possibly to trap animals.

The man's existence proves that, even when alone in the middle of the Amazon, it's possible to survive and resist allying with society, according to FUNAI.

ABC News' Ben Gittleson contributed to this report.

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Health

Parents desperate to help children they believe have rare, controversial disorder

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Parents desperate to help children they believe have controversial disorder battle skeptics

PlayABC News

WATCH Home videos show young girl throwing unexplainable, volatile tantrums

Vanessa Baier's 4-year-old daughter Alexia was in full-on crisis.

"I just kept thinking, 'What's going on with my child?'" Vanessa Baier told "20/20" while fighting back tears.

Alexia had been breaking out into erratic, explosive behavior that would appear completely out of left field.

"It was just swings that were very dramatic and uncalled for, for the situation," her father, Brian Baier, told "20/20."

PHOTO: She had such a fun personality, Vanessa Baier described her daughter, Alexia. Baier Family Photo
"She had such a fun personality," Vanessa Baier described her daughter, Alexia.

"There have been times where [her tantrum] was an hour and a half, two hours," Vanessa Baier said.

Alexia, now 8, wasn't always so volatile. Her mother, a special-needs teacher; her father, an accountant; and their oldest daughter, Kyla, had all welcomed a very typical baby girl to their loving home outside Chicago.

"She had such a fun personality. She was always laughing, smiling," Vanessa Baier said.

And as Alexia began attending preschool, her mom said her daughter was excited and loved her new friends and teachers.

"She was on track. She was even advanced in different areas. She was just a typical 4-year-old," AJ McCree, the school's principal, told "20/20."

PHOTO: The Baiers admitted their daughter, Alexia, into a psychiatric ward after she tried to stab her mother in the eye with a mascara wand. Baier Family Photo
The Baiers admitted their daughter, Alexia, into a psychiatric ward after she tried to stab her mother in the eye with a mascara wand.

But in the winter of 2014, Alexia got sick. A doctor diagnosed her with strep throat.

"That was the first time she ever had strep throat," Vanessa Baier said. "No big deal, just run-of-the-mill strep throat."

Alexia was prescribed a typical course of antibiotics, but as the infection disappeared, her bubbly personality began to change.

"It was less than two days later. It was defiance and OCD [behavior]. She just all of a sudden seemed angry," her mother said.

"It really came to my attention that something was off when Lexi would start to destroy the classroom," McCree said, referring to Alexia. "It was a lot of screaming, a lot of hitting and kicking adults."

(MORE: What is PANDAS, the disorder some doctors say can cause extreme behavioral changes in kids?)

Alarmed teachers isolated Alexia from the other preschoolers and even resorted to using bookshelves as barricades.

"Furniture would get tipped over. Bins of toys were dumped or thrown at people. When we would try and keep her safe in an isolated area, she would continue to elevate and elevate," McCree said.

"They had to call in the social worker, the psychologist, the principal. I mean, there was a team of teachers involved," Vanessa Baier said. "It was like a Tasmanian devil running through the classroom."

Tearfully remembering her daughter's worsening behavior, Vanessa Baier said she felt "a lot of guilt and personal blame about what am I doing wrong? And how can we help?"

McCree, the school's principal, said that when a child suddenly acts out, it may indicate trouble at home, but, he said, Alexia was an anomaly, because her home life appeared very stable.

"When somebody switches temperaments, we look to see is something changing at the home? Whether it's the parents that are separating and any violence that they might be exposed to that way and it just didn't seem to be the case with this family," he said.

PHOTO: It was like a Tasmanian devil running through the classroom, said Vanessa Baier.Baier Family Photo
"It was like a Tasmanian devil running through the classroom," said Vanessa Baier.

"We're trying to team together to try to figure out what's going on, but at the same time it's like this just isn't making sense," Vanessa Baier said. "I don't know how to de-escalate my own child."

This was especially troubling to Vanessa Baier because de-escalating children in crisis is part of her responsibility as a special-needs teacher.

But things became dire when Alexia's prolonged tantrums turned into threats toward her family and herself.

"Telling my 6-year-old (Kyla), 'You have to stay in your bedroom because I don't know what your sister is capable of,' is heartbreaking. She knew the whole time. She had told me, 'Something's wrong with Alexia's brain.' She knew," Vanessa Baier said. "'Something happened because this is not my sister.'"

Vanessa Baier said Alexia knew something was wrong too.

"She would cry and say, 'Mommy, why can't I be good? I just want to be good.' That broke my heart," she said.

A trip for milkshakes turns into a scary moment

Vanessa Baier began taping Alexia's episodes because her husband was often at work when the worst behaviors would occur.

"A lot of times he was discounting it," Vanessa Baier said. "The psychologist we went to, she told me it was my mom guilt. … I was like, 'Nobody’s believing me.'"

It took a toll on Vanessa and Brian Baier's marriage.

"Him not believing me, that hurts, and then the arguing about how to discipline her and what was going on," Vanessa Baier said.

"At the beginning, I'm at work, working 50, 60 hours a week. I can't be on the phone with you for an hour talking to you every day or come home every day to help you deal with these situations," Brian Baier said. "Before I really recognized what it was, that it wasn't something that she could deal with alone and shouldn't have to.”

Kyla, Alexia's older sister, said the tantrums scared her.

"When Alexia starts throwing a tantrum, I kind of get sad," Kyla told "20/20."

VIDEO: Home videos show young girl throwing unexplainable, volatile tantrumsPlay
Home videos show young girl throwing unexplainable, volatile tantrums

When she was in the middle of a flare-up, Alexia said, she couldn't sense that something is happening.

"I just go and try to hurt people," Alexia told "20/20."

After three months of relentless emotional anguish, Vanessa Baier said an incident during a simple run for milkshakes became the final straw.

It seemed like a routine trip until Alexia insisted on having some of her mother's milkshake while Vanessa Baier was driving them home.

Vanessa Baier had told Alexia: "No."

"Then she (Alexia) said, 'If you don't give me your milkshake, I'm going to unbuckle my seatbelt,' and I didn't respond," Vanessa Baier said. "Then she counted, 'One, two, three,' and then I heard a click."

PHOTO: Vanessa Baier said that her husband, Brian Baier, was often at work when Alexias worst behaviors would occur. Baier Family Photo
Vanessa Baier said that her husband, Brian Baier, was often at work when Alexia's worst behaviors would occur.

Alexia had unbuckled her car seat and started rummaging through her mother's purse. Vanessa Baier pulled over and turned to her daughter.

"As I picked my head up, she was stabbing me in the eye with my mascara wand. I was scared. I was scared for all of our safety," Vanessa Baier said. "This isn't normal, you know. Four-year-olds don't unbuckle their seat belts in the car to stab their mommy in the eye with a mascara wand all over a milkshake."

She called her husband, who was at work.

"He immediately dropped what he was doing and left work. I said, 'You need to stay on the phone this entire time, just in case. If something happens, you need to call 911,'" Vanessa Baier said. "I didn't feel that I was safe, that Kyla was safe or that Alexia was even safe from herself."

Out of options, the desperate parents did what had been previously unthinkable to them: They had Alexia admitted to a psychiatric hospital.

"[It was] the hardest nine days of my life," Vanessa Baier said through tears. "We could only see her for an hour a day. She was allowed to call us once a day. … For a 4-year-old, those phone calls that she got once a day, she spent crying to me, 'Why did you leave me? I need you. I need you to come back.'"

Her parents say that after Alexia spent nine excruciating days in the hospital, she was prescribed numerous medications meant to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

"They [the medications] made her like a shell of her person. When she was on this medication, all that happiness was gone. Then she was still having these bouts of rage and aggression," Vanessa Baier said.

PHOTO: Vanessa Baier is a special needs teacher whose advocacy helped pressure Illinois to become the first and only state to require insurance companies to cover PANDAS treatments.Baier Family Photo
Vanessa Baier is a special needs teacher whose advocacy helped pressure Illinois to become the first and only state to require insurance companies to cover PANDAS treatments.

Parker Barnes' family struggles to help their son

About 400 miles away from the Baiers, another family's child was suffering in suburban Minnesota.

Natalie and Brian Barnes' son Parker had been having seizures and dealing with debilitating anxiety, rage and depression for months.

"I would liken it to an abduction. Something came in the window and stole our child and left behind this shell. Our kid is gone!" Brian Barnes told "20/20."

The Barnes family's lives changed in April 2017 when Parker, the oldest of four children, was just 10. He was a rambunctious and outgoing boy. But midway through fourth grade, Parker began acting differently, with odd tics and strange moodiness.

PHOTO: Midway through fourth grade, Parker began acting differently, with odd tics and strange moodiness. The Barnes family
Midway through fourth grade, Parker began acting differently, with odd tics and strange moodiness.

Then one day, his brother Stetson was heading to the family's upstairs bathroom and ran into Parker.

"I'm like, 'Mom! Dad! He's going to stab himself!'" Stetson told "20/20."

"I ran up to the bathroom and there he stood with a knife in his hand," Natalie Barnes told "20/20."

"Bawling uncontrollably," Brian Barnes said.

"He was, like, in a trance, and I just grabbed the knife. And I'm just hugging him, and he's like, 'I just didn't want me to hurt anybody with the strep anymore,'" Natalie Barnes said.

VIDEO: Parents record 11-year-old sons battle with rage, depression, anxiety and seizuresPlay
Parents record 11-year-old son's battle with rage, depression, anxiety and seizures

Parker said he was not sure if he really wanted to hurt himself with the knife that day.

An emergency room doctor recommended that Parker be evaluated by a psychiatrist, and just like the Baier family, the Barneses checked Parker into a psychiatric hospital.

"That was a nightmare," Parker, now 12, told "20/20." "That was like a prison for children 'cause all the children didn't want to see their families, because they were all so like angry or mean or something."

As Parker was evaluated, one doctor became struck by one factor in his case. She learned that Parker's symptoms had first begun months earlier, when he had been diagnosed with strep throat.

"She said he might have something called PANDAS, and we're like, 'PANDAS?'" Natalie Barnes said.

What is PANDAS?

Twenty years ago, Dr. Susan Swedo of the National Institute of Mental Health first identified the disorder as Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS).

"In its simplest form, the wrong strep in the wrong kid impacts the brain and gives rise to behavioral symptoms," Swedo told "20/20."

Swedo said that normally when children get strep, their bodies create antibodies to fight the infection. But, she said, in certain children, those antibodies start attacking healthy cells and, even worse, sneak across what's called the "blood-brain barrier."

"It's designed to protect the brain. We now know that the blood-brain barrier can become 'leaky,'" Swedo said.

PHOTO: Parkers plasmapheresis could cost his parents, Brian and Natalie Barnes, as much as $100,000. ABC News
Parker's plasmapheresis could cost his parents, Brian and Natalie Barnes, as much as $100,000.

And once the brain is invaded, Swedo said, children can very rapidly exhibit a wide range of psychiatric and neurological problems — including the extreme kind both Parker and Alexia have.

"So traditional onset [of OCD or obsessive compulsive disorder] is gradual. It comes over a period of days or weeks. PANDAS OCD comes on overnight," Swedo said.

"I'm thinking, 'Great. Good. PANDAS. Is there a syrup for that?'" Brian Barnes said. "They're going to have the right thing — the anti-PANDAS pill — and whatever that is, it'll be gone and we'll be down the road and get our kid back, OK?"

Brian and Natalie Barnes took Parker to more than a dozen doctors in Minnesota looking for a remedy for PANDAS, showing them videos of his erratic behavior. They got limited results.

"I would have to say most the time they would go, 'Hmm.' Nobody ever said, 'O.M.G., I can't believe he's doing that. Let's figure it out!'" Brian Barnes said.

Their quest for better treatment took them to Dr. Beth Latimer, a pediatric neurologist in Washington D.C. who takes on the PANDAS cases that many other doctors don't.

"I have felt tremendous amount of responsibility for these kids," Latimer told "20/20." "I've seen people move from one side of the country to the other. Parents get divorced because they can't deal with the trauma of this illness."

PHOTO: I would liken it to an abduction, said Brian Barnes, describing the sudden change of behavior in his son, Parker.The Barnes family
"I would liken it to an abduction," said Brian Barnes, describing the sudden change of behavior in his son, Parker.

Latimer started seeing PANDAS patients 15 years ago and quickly became a last resort for parents who say they are unable to find help elsewhere.

She spent more than two hours evaluating Parker medically and learning his developmental history, but perhaps the most compelling visual evidence Latimer saw was the dramatic and, at times, disturbing home video Brian and Natalie Barnes had taken to document their son's ordeal.

Their videos show Parker's behavior ranging from unresponsive to full-on rage. Parker is shown moaning and whining.

"He would just freeze up," Natalie Barnes said. "You can't get him out of it."

Latimer said she knows PANDAS when she sees it — even though she said PANDAS can look completely different from patient to patient — and believes Parker has the disorder.

PHOTO: Kathryn was 9 years old when she suddenly started exhibiting bizarre behaviors. ABC News
Kathryn was 9 years old when she suddenly started exhibiting bizarre behaviors.

Kathryn Ulicki's family wonders what caused her sudden change in behavior

As a young girl, Kathryn Ulicki, now 12, suddenly started exhibiting bizarre behavior.

Rather than breaking out into screaming fits or convulsions, Kathryn suddenly feared that she would suffer an allergic reaction or be poisoned from food. So one day, she just stopped eating.

"I had no idea what was going on," Michael Ulicki, her father, told "20/20."

Kathryn had a longstanding allergy to sesame, but this level of paranoia when it came to eating was new. Kathryn said she wanted to eat and drink but feared that she would have an allergic reaction.

"I was, like, scared to swallow my own saliva, so I would just spit the whole entire day," Kathryn told "20/20."

It's not clear whether Kathryn had an undetected strep infection or whether the onset of symptoms was triggered by a different infection, according to her parents. But within two weeks of an onset of symptoms, Kathryn, then 9, went into the hospital for dehydration. She stayed there for three weeks. She had a feeding tube for nearly two months. Things only got worse.

PHOTO: Kathryn Ulicki ended up in a hospital with a feeding tube after she stopped eating because she feared she would have an allergic reaction. Ulicki Family Photo
Kathryn Ulicki ended up in a hospital with a feeding tube after she stopped eating because she feared she would have an allergic reaction.

"You don't go from zero to crazy in that short a period of time from a perfectly normal kid," Kathryn's father, Michael Ulicki, told "20/20."

"One day, I was, like, crying to my dad, and I was, like, 'I want to die,'" Kathryn said.

Michael Ulicki said he was afraid for Kathryn's life. The Ulickis say that, fortunately, they found a lifeline in Latimer, who was six hours away from their Cheshire, Connecticut, home.

Latimer said Kathryn's case of PANDAS was unusual.

"Kathryn actually surprised me. She came and she couldn't swallow anything. She was spitting into a cup and drooling constantly," Latimer said.

"This is what we call 'a cognitive specialty.' You have to sit. You have to talk. You have to listen. If you're running patients in and out of your clinic in a loop, you're not going to pick this up," Latimer said. "That is a very important reason to see the person, the child in person, with the parents before you make any decision. You have to hear the whole story before you can make a decision."

Latimer was confident that she could help. She wanted to put Kathryn, then 9 years old, on steroids. Latimer believed that the injections would calm Kathryn's immune system, which had gone haywire.

The solution may sound radical to some parents. Still, the Ulickis believed they'd found a savior in Latimer.

"I remember thinking of her like a gladiator, because it's a disease that needs to be slayed," Michael Ulicki said.

PHOTO: After the steroid treatment, Kathryn Ulicki went through several other treatments including homeopathy. Ulicki Family Photo
After the steroid treatment, Kathryn Ulicki went through several other treatments including homeopathy.

A look at the debate about the existence of PANDAS

Filmmaker Tim Sorel followed seven anguished families from across the country, including the Ulickis, and their struggles with PANDAS for his documentary "My Kid Is Not Crazy."

"Every day was trying for me, trying not to cry," Sorel said. "You see a child robbed of their life. … There's nothing quite like it."

Sometimes the parents he was following would call him in the middle of the night, Sorel said, because they didn't know what to do and they said they weren't getting satisfactory answers from doctors.

He said he heard the same story repeatedly: families lost in a maze of a disorder that appears differently from one child to the next and with symptoms ranging from out-of-control rages, depression and odd tics to severe panic attacks.

As Sorel discovered and Swedo of the National Institute of Mental Health confirmed, many medical professionals don't believe PANDAS is a legitimate condition, making it difficult to get a PANDAS diagnosis.

Swedo said she is as frustrated as parents about how hard it is to find doctors who treat the condition.

"They dismiss it," Swedo said. "We don't have an argument with people that think this exists and it might be rare. The argument is with people who are literally PANDAS deniers."

Dr. Donald Gilbert directs the Tourette Syndrome Clinic and the Movement Disorders Clinic at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, as well as being a professor of child neurology at the University of Cincinnati. He participated in two PANDAS research studies over a seven year period and has reviewed other studies. While he does allow that a very small number of children may have PANDAS, he also feels that there is no solid data to prove that strep causes underlying OCD, tics or any other psychiatric or neurological conditions in children.

PHOTO: Dr. Susan Swedo of the National Institute of Mental Health first identified PANDAS as a behavior disorder in children 20 years ago. ABC News
Dr. Susan Swedo of the National Institute of Mental Health first identified "PANDAS" as a behavior disorder in children 20 years ago.

“I think that the majority of people that believe they have PANDAS just have regular old OCD or regular old tics … I think there are kids whose tics or OCD symptoms get worse after strep. In that sense, PANDAS exists. But those same kids are also likely, based on the study that we participated in, to have exacerbations later that are totally unrelated to any infection.”

Gilbert adds, “I think child neurologists are almost uniformly skeptical … at most this is a very, very rare condition.”

But Swedo argues that PANDAS is not rare, but "uncommon."

"It probably affects somewhere between one in 200 and one in 500 every year," she said. "In the country as a whole, it's far, far under-recognized and under-treated."

Experts, including Swedo and Latimer, do point out that many children will get strep and other infections and never have behavioral problems, while others will develop neuropsychiatric symptoms without any infection.

Still, Gilbert said he believes PANDAS is "way over-diagnosed."

"It's very different to say, 'There's a few kids that have this,' versus saying that maybe 10 percent of OCD cases are caused in this way," he said.

Swedo said she’s faced an onslaught of published opposition in medical journals.

In an email to ABC News, another doctor who expressed skepticism about PANDAS said, "The original concept that patients can present with typical Tourette's syndrome or OCD due to an autoimmune response to strep infection has largely been dismissed. The whole concept is very tenuous now."

PHOTO: Dr. Donald Gilbert, a professor of child neurology at the University of Cincinnati, said research had yet to prove that strep causes OCD or any psychiatric condition in children.ABC News
Dr. Donald Gilbert, a professor of child neurology at the University of Cincinnati, said research had yet to prove that strep causes OCD or any psychiatric condition in children.

According to Swedo, that is one doctor's opinion.

"He is just wrong," she said.

"Like a drum beating, it just won't stop," she continued. "Maybe like in politics, if you repeat a lie often enough, it's construed to be the truth. So the physicians have been afraid."

Sorel, the filmmaker, said he'd seen both sides of the fight while making his film.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently weighed in, saying that there aren't enough quality studies to prove PANDAS is a real disorder and that it refused to endorse treatment plans, including ones that were published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology in 2015 and updated in 2017.

Families, like the Barnes, say the controversy surrounding the diagnosis only makes things worse. They say insurance companies rarely pay for unconventional PANDAS treatments, which in Parker's case have run close to $50,000.

"You submit to the insurance company, you say 'Pretty please,' and they tell you, 'No, it's considered experimental,'" Natalie and Brian Barnes said.

Natalie says that after she discovered insurance had covered one treatment for another family, her employer changed its policy to assist her in getting coverage.

PHOTO: Dr. Beth Latimer is a pediatric neurologist who wanted to put Kathryn Ulicki, then 11 years old, on steroids.ABC News
Dr. Beth Latimer is a pediatric neurologist who wanted to put Kathryn Ulicki, then 11 years old, on steroids.

America's Health Insurance Plans, an insurance lobbying group, told ABC News in a statement, in part, that while there is no coding specific to PANDAS, "clinical policies are made in the interest of patient safety and value. They are determined based on scientific evidence regarding conditions and the treatments that are found to be most effective for treating them."

The group also said that if a family is turned down for coverage, it can always appeal the decision.

Kathryn's family says that it has spent more than $10,000 out of pocket for various treatments but that insurance did cover some of her expenses.

One of the treatments was a steroid that Latimer prescribed to Kathryn. After just two weeks of treatment, her parents say Kathryn started eating again. Latimer said her prognosis going forward was "excellent" and she could be expected to have a totally normal life.

"I mean she probably has sort of a foggy recollection of it. … But she won't be traumatized," Latimer said.

What life is like today for children since their treatment for PANDAS

ABC News visited Kathryn three years after she saw Latimer. In that time, she was back at school and eventually, back to a normal life. The girl who once wouldn't eat now has a healthy appetite.

"I feel a lot better today, like emotionally and physically," Kathryn said.

Her parents said her transformation has been amazing.

"It's kind of nice now in a way," Michael Ulicki said. "There are times I forget about PANDAS."

Sorel, the filmmaker, said Kathryn's "happy ending" was truly wonderful to see.

PHOTO: Brian and Natalie Barnes 12-year-old son Parker is the oldest of four children. The Barnes family
Brian and Natalie Barnes' 12-year-old son Parker is the oldest of four children.

"I want to emphasize we don't know what got her better, but who cares what got her better as long as she did," he said.

After she finished the steroid treatment, Kathryn continued several other treatments, even homeopathy, so the solution could have been due to any number of things.

Skeptics point out, however, that in some cases, a patient may improve on his or her own. Dr. Gilbert, the University of Cincinnati professor of child neurology, says "I think as a general principle, over time, many things get better. It's quite possible. I don't know for sure, but that does happen."

But the parents of children believed to have PANDAS say their question is: what do they do if their child does not get better and how long are they supposed to wait?

As Kathryn progressed, the Barnes family continued searching for answers. Natalie and Brian Barnes had every intention of putting Parker through the intensive treatment that Latimer had suggested — plasmapheresis, a process to remove the antibodies attacking his immune system — even though it would mean Parker would have to spend a week at a hospital in the intensive care unit.

"Parker suffers every day," Natalie Barnes said. "He has no childhood right now. It's like if you had a child that was told they had leukemia and they had to be hospitalized to get chemotherapy, you would not hesitate."

But again, some doctors consider the treatment controversial and don't accept it as a proper course, including, the Barneses said, their local immunologist.

"He said, 'I will not participate on any level with your son if you give him that treatment. I don't agree with it and I won't touch him,'" Brian Barnes said.

Because Latimer could not admit Parker to a Minnesota hospital and the family's local immunologist was unwilling to participate in the process and lengthy follow-up, plasmapheresis was scrapped as an option for now.

"The logistical problem of trying to get it arranged was confounding," Brian Barnes said.

The Barnes say, as for next steps, "There's a million ways and … it depends on what your doctor considers serious … [and] what they're comfortable ordering," Natalie Barnes said.

VIDEO: Girl says she was afraid she was allergic to food and her own saliva Play
Girl says she was afraid she was allergic to food and her own saliva

Parker's parents kept trying to find a solution for him. This summer, there seemed to be some progress. Doctors increased the frequency of his medications, steroid treatments and injections to boost or supplement his immune system and by the time he turned 12, they say things seemed to be getting better.

But it didn't last. His parents said he started hearing voices and having hallucinations — symptoms they hadn't seen in him in more than a year.

"He had moments where he would be OK and then he would just dive down to a place we hadn't seen," Brian Barnes said. "It's back in the scary places where he's become very unpredictable. … He would sit there and chant, 'Die, suffer, bleed. … Die, suffer, bleed.'"

During this chanting, Brian Barnes said Parker would go on to say, "I should bleed. I should make myself bleed."

As a parent, "panic can set in very quickly," Brian Barnes said.

He and Natalie Barnes began yet another search for another doctor. They were finally able to get an appointment for later this month with a specialist who, they say, is open to the idea of giving Parker plasmapheresis in Minnesota. They estimated that the cost would be as much as $100,000 for treatment and follow-ups.

As the Barnes family hopes insurance will cover their son's next course of treatment, the Baier family may have found some hope.

It was just a few years ago that Alexia was put into a psychiatric ward and prescribed medication for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Now at 8 years old, she is thriving. She was chosen out of her entire school as the "Student of the Month" for positive behavior.

Her family said Alexia had responded well to a different antibiotic than the one she'd been given when she first had strep, along with a few other medications. Her parents also are trying everything they can to keep her compromised immune system away from bacteria and infection.

"She actually had her tonsils and adenoids removed" in January 2015, said her mother, Vanessa Baier. "Then she stopped getting the strep, but then she started reacting to colds, to allergies, to other people having strep or even colds. Now it's like she's responding to anything and everything. … It's as if her immune system doesn't quite know what to do."

Vanessa Baier said Alexia still has "flare-ups" and they expect to still have struggles with Alexia's health going forward. She has had 15 doses of antibiotics in the last three years.

VIDEO: Doctor explains PANDAS: How the psychological, neurological condition impacts brainPlay
Doctor explains PANDAS: How the psychological, neurological condition impacts brain

"She needs to know to be able to talk about it and tell people what she needs when she is in a flare and how that might impact her as a person," Vanessa Baier said. "She tried steroids. She did OK but it didn't seem to make a big effect. I don't know. With other kids, it does, but that's part of the hard thing with PANDAS. It's not one size fits all."

During an intense flare-up, Alexia's doctor recommended IVIg therapy, which provides donated antibodies to assist compromised immune systems, that many PANDAS families opt to try.

"We were told insurance wasn't going to cover it, but this is what she needs, so you need to look into paying out of pocket. It was going to cost us between $18,000 and $24,000 to cover the treatment," Vanessa Baier said.

This sparked Vanessa Baier into becoming an advocate alongside other families and they were able to push the state of Illinois to become the first and only state so far to require insurance companies to cover PANDAS treatments.

Vanessa Baier and her girls stood next to Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner in July 2017, as he signed the legislation into law at a kitchen table, which she said was symbolic to show that this is an issue that affects entire families, not just the young patients.

"My child is there seeing the hard work that I've put into this and other amazing PANDAS parents who have put this hard work into getting this bill signed. It was amazing," Vanessa Baier said. "I really think that it's not just the child who suffers with PANDAS, it's the entire family, and this could happen at anybody's kitchen table.”

Watch the full story on ABC News' "20/20" FRIDAY at 10 p.m. ET and on “Nightline” at 12:35 a.m. ET.

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Health

What is PANDAS, the disorder some say can cause extreme behavioral changes in kids?

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What is PANDAS, the disorder some doctors say can cause extreme behavioral changes in kids?

PlayVanessa Baier

WATCH Doctor explains PANDAS: How the psychological, neurological condition impacts brain

Alexia Baier was an eager-to-learn, 4-year-old girl beginning pre-K in a suburb outside of Chicago. She thrived academically — counting, painting and playing with other children.

But five months after starting pre-K, she was infected with a bacteria that several millions of people get every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bacteria, group A strep, caused Alexia to get strep throat, a condition children usually recover from easily with treatment.

After 10 days of antibiotics, the infection disappeared but so did Alexia's bubbly personality. Within two days after completing antibiotics, Alexia began showing behavioral changes at home and eventually at school. She suddenly became defiant and explosive.

"It was a lot of screaming, a lot of hitting and kicking adults," said school principal AJ McCree. "When we would try and keep her safe in an isolated area, she would continue to elevate and elevate."

Alexia's mother, Vanessa Baier, couldn't believe the shocking change.

"They had to call in the social worker, the psychologist, the principal. It was like a Tasmanian devil running through the classroom," she said.

Holding back tears, Baier said she wondered: "What am I doing wrong?"

It was a four-month-long emotional roller coaster dealing with the toll on the family's personal life and a lack of answers from the medical community until Alexia started threatening violence against others, including herself. She even attacked her mother.

Alexia Baier is seen here during a doctors visit. Vanessa Baier
Alexia Baier is seen here during a doctor's visit.

While Baier was driving, Alexia became violent toward her mother during a trip to get milkshakes. Baier said that Alexia began asking for a second milkshake. When Baier refused, she said, she heard Alexia unbuckle her seat belt.

"I pulled over and I turned to her. As I picked my head up, she was stabbing me in the eye with my mascara wand," Baier said.

Baier said that between the threat of self-harm and the increased violence she realized she needed to take extreme measures.

At 4 years old, Alexia was admitted to residential treatment. After nine days of observation, Baier wasn't convinced that Alexia was getting the help she needed. She said that the doctors' diagnosis of bipolar disorder didn't seem right to her and that Alexia was sent home with prescriptions for stimulant and antipsychotic medications that didn't seem to be working.

Baier said the medication made her daughter a zombie and she was still having explosive moments.

"I was not in denial. The only thing that I kept questioning is, 'But why did this suddenly come on? Wouldn't I have seen signs? Or does bipolar just … come out of nowhere like this? And what about that strep?'" she said.

Eventually, a neuropsychologist connected the timing of the strep and immediate onset of behavioral symptoms.

Baier said that's when the doctor asked: "'OK, have you ever heard of PANDAS?' [I was] definitely relieved to have some sort of diagnosis that made sense."

Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS)

Some physicians believe PANDAS is the sudden onset of tics, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder-like behavior or other behavioral changes as a result of a streptococcal infection like strep throat. After a child gets strep throat, the immune system produces proteins, like antibodies, to protect itself.

However, some doctors think that in some cases, these antibodies may mistake its own immune system as foreign and actually attack the child's own body, including the brain, triggering inflammation as a result of the misguided immune response. They say this "autoimmune" attack causes neuropsychiatric changes in the child, presenting as behavioral changes, like OCD and tic disorders. There is a wide range and severity of symptoms, with Alexia’s case on the more extreme end.

There is also the emergence of a broader umbrella term called Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS), which includes not only PANDAS but also symptoms thought to be caused by non-strep infections or other inflammatory disturbances to the system.

These non-strep infections include bacteria and viruses like Lyme disease, mycoplasma pneumonia or walking pneumonia, herpes simplex viruses and the common cold, according to the National Institutes of Health.

The thought is that this whole set of conditions boils down to one presumed cause: an overly active immune response that is sudden in onset but looks like OCD or behavioral problems. It's no longer thought to be just about the strep. Experts caution, however, that many children will get strep and other infections with no resulting behavioral changes, while others experience behavioral changes without a prior infection.

Some doctors say the presentation of PANDAS is broad and can vary. The diagnosis requires two of the following symptoms, according to the National Institute of Mental Health: anxiety, emotional instability/depression, oppositional behavior like aggression, losing development in behavior, worsening of school performance, disabilities in sensory or motor capabilities as well as signs and symptoms like sleep or urinary problems or eating restrictions. A collaborative effort among different PANDAS researchers has resulted in this set of criteria.

Dr. Susan Swedo, senior investigator in pediatrics behavior and Chief of the Pediatrics and Developmental Neuroscience Branch with the National Institute of Health, has been studying PANDAS for decades and was the first, with her team, to identify PANDAS. Although she said the disorder is uncommon, she estimates it affects one in 200 or one in 500 children.

She also said that far too many of her fellow doctors don't think PANDAS is real.

"They dismiss it. We don't have an argument with people that think this exists and it might be rare. The argument is with people who are literally PANDAS deniers," she said.

There is controversy over whether the streptococcal infection of PANDAS is really what causes persistent behavioral changes. Some doctors believe the sequential onset of strep throat and these changes could be coincidental.

Dr. Donald Gilbert, professor of child neurology at the University of Cincinnati and the director of two clinics at Cincinnati’s Children Medical Center, told ABC he believes "the majority of those who believe they have PANDAS just have regular OCD or regular old tics.”

Gilbert said that even if PANDAS is a legitimate diagnosis, it is most likely extremely rare and overdiagnosed. He is not alone in those beliefs.

PHOTO: Dr. Susan Swedo of the National Institute of Mental Health first identified PANDAS as a behavior disorder in children 20 years ago. ABC News
Dr. Susan Swedo of the National Institute of Mental Health first identified "PANDAS" as a behavior disorder in children 20 years ago.

Swedo acknowledged that some doctors may be over-treating but said on a whole the disorder is underdiagnosed countrywide. She said that's in part because of the number of fellow physicians who do not believe in the diagnosis of PANDAS. This makes it hard, she said, for families to find physicians willing to treat the condition.

However, some national medical organizations remain unconvinced that PANDAS is real, citing the lack of unduplicated or quality studies.

The American Academy of Pediatrics "Red Book," a guide used by many pediatricians for infectious diseases like streptococcus, contains its stance on PANDAS.

According to the AAP Red Book, the evidence for PANDAS has relied on only a small number of patients and the authors have concluded that there is not a specific enough relationship between group A strep and the neuropsychiatric disorders to suggest treatment with antibiotics or any other therapy.

The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests management not by pediatricians, but by specialists like child psychiatrists, behavioral and developmental pediatricians or child neurologists.

The AAP states that management of any specific symptoms of OCD and tic disorders should be left to the specialists. Although some researchers and clinicians believe that treatments including antibiotics and certain immunotherapy may help “children with symptoms suggestive of PANDAS or PANS”, the AAP says there aren't enough studies to prove this yet.

Alexia Baier is awarded 'Student of the Month'

Today, Alexia is 8 and, her parents say, doing a lot better. After receiving the diagnosis of PANDAS from a neurologist three years ago, she was placed on different antibiotics for the streptococcus bacteria, took steroids and had her tonsils and adenoids removed.

She does have occasional flare-ups but they are quickly treated with antibiotics, according to the family. Alexia improved behaviorally and was even awarded "Student of the Month" out of her entire school. With the return to a sense of normalcy, the family decided to turn their scary experience into an opportunity for advocacy.

For Alexia and her family, their experience with PANDAS was enough for them to join the fight with other families to pressure Illinois to become the first and only state so far requiring insurance companies to financially support PANDAS treatment. The law was passed and signed into law in Illinois in July 2017.

Constant research continues and supporters of PANDAS hope that the policy, financial support and health-care stance on this issue will shift and improve along with understanding. They say this will require the collaborative work of both critics and supporters of PANDAS.

To learn more about PANDAS, click here for more information.

ABC News' Neha Chaudhary contributed to this story.

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Lifestyle

Relationship Forgiveness Quotes : Quotes To Inspire You And Let Go

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When we have been hurt in a relationship, it is difficult to move past this painful time in our lives. Forgiving our partner is a key step toward regaining personal peace and happiness. These forgiveness quotes will give you ways to escape the self-defeating thoughts that are swirling in your head. Quotes about forgiveness will make you strong enough to let the relationship go. It’s possible that you may decide to move forward with the relationship, and the best forgiveness quotes will teach you how to put the past behind you.

Forgiveness quotes come from a wide variety of sources such as business leaders, poets, novelists, and celebrities. When you are choosing quotes about forgiveness that match your situation, follow your heart. The forgiveness quotes that speak to you the most are the ones that will help you move on.

17 Forgiveness Quotes to Help Soothe your Soul

1. ”There is no love without forgiveness, and there is no forgiveness without love.”
Bryant H. McGill

2. “Forgiveness is the best form of love. It takes a strong person to say sorry and an even stronger person to forgive.”
Unknown

3. “Forgiveness is a sign that the person who has wronged you means more to you than the wrong they have dealt.”
Ben Greenhalgh

4. “Forgiveness is an act of the will, and the will can function regardless of the temperature of the heart.”
Corrie ten Boom

5. “Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,
Men were deceivers ever,-
One foot in sea and one on shore,
To one thing constant never.”
William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

6. “Forgiveness is the fragrance that the violet sheds on the heel that has crushed it.”
Mark Twain

7. “Sometimes you have to forgive and forget, forgive them for hurting you, and forget they even exist.”
Unknown

8. “Some forgive and forget, more forgive and remember, most forgive and remind.”
Unknown

9. “People have to forgive. We don’t have to like them, we don’t have to be friends with them, we don’t have to send them hearts in text messages, but we have to forgive them, to overlook, to forget. Because if we don’t we are tying rocks to our feet, too much for our wings to carry!”
C. JoyBell C.

10. “Forgiveness has nothing to do with absolving a criminal of his crime. It has everything to do with relieving oneself of the burden of being a victim–letting go of the pain and transforming oneself from victim to survivor.”
C.R. Strahan

11. “When you forgive, you love. And when you love, God’s light shines upon you.”
Jon Krakauer, Into the Wild

12. “Appreciate those who love you, help those who need you, forgive those who hurt you, forget those who leave you.”
Unknown

13. “As I walked out the door toward the gate that would lead to my freedom, I knew if I didn’t leave my bitterness and hatred behind, I’d still be in prison.”
Nelson Mandela

14. “Not forgiving is like drinking rat poison and then waiting for the rat to die.”
Anne Lamott, Traveling Mercies: Some Thoughts on Faith

15. “Thus with my lips have I denounced you, while my heart, bleeding within me, called you tender names.
It was love lashed by its own self that spoke. It was pride half slain that fluttered in the dust. It was my hunger for your love that raged from the housetop, while my own love, kneeling in silence, prayed for your forgiveness.”
Kahlil Gibran, The Forerunner: His Parables and Poems

16. “Forgiveness in no way requires that you trust the one you forgive.”
William Paul Young, The Shack

17. “All too often women believe it is a sign of commitment, an expression of love, to endure unkindness or cruelty, to forgive and forget. In actuality, when we love rightly we know that the healthy, loving response to cruelty and abuse is putting ourselves out of harm’s way.”
Bbell hooks, All About Love: New Visions

These forgiveness quotes can be helpful for anyone who has suffered through the loss of a relationship. They are also helpful when the people you need to forgive are your family. Don’t let anger and bitterness rule your life. Use these forgiveness quotes to lead your heart forward into a better place.

The best forgiveness quotes teach us how to let go of the past without letting go of ourselves. Use these quotes whenever you are feeling sad and betrayed. They will bring you calm and solace.

(C)Power of Positivity, LLC. All rights reserved

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Technology

One giant sale: Neil Armstrong’s collection goes to auction

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One giant sale: Neil Armstrong's collection goes to auction

The Associated Press
FILE – In this July 16, 1969, file photo, Neil Armstrong waving in front, heads for the van that will take the crew to the rocket for launch to the moon at Kennedy Space Center in Merritt Island, Fla. When Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon, he captured the attention and admiration of millions of people around the world. Now fans of Armstrong and of space exploration have a chance to own artifacts and mementos that belonged to the modest man who became a global hero. The personal collection of Armstrong, who died in 2012, will be offered for sale in a series of auctions handled by Dallas-based Heritage Auctions. (AP Photo/File)

Admirers of Neil Armstrong and space exploration have a chance to own artifacts and mementos that belonged to the modest man who became a global hero by becoming the first human to walk on the moon.

The personal collection of Armstrong, who died in his native Ohio in 2012, will be offered for sale in a series of auctions handled by Dallas-based Heritage Auctions, beginning Nov. 1-2 and continuing in May and November 2019.

The collection includes a variety of artifacts from Armstrong's 1969 lunar landing and private mementos that include pieces of a wing and propeller from the 1903 Wright Brothers Flyer that the astronaut took with him to the moon.

Other items that went to the moon with Armstrong include a U.S. flag, the largest size typically flown during Apollo missions; a United Nations flag; various state flags; and some Robbins Medallions. The sterling silver medallions were paid for by the crews of Apollo missions and were available for purchase only by NASA astronauts. Armstrong's collection also includes a rare gold medallion.

Among the more personal items to be auctioned are a Purdue University centennial flag from Armstrong's alma mater that traveled on Apollo 11 and his Boy Scout cap.

Armstrong's son, Mark Armstrong, said his father never talked to him about what he wanted done with the large amount of items he kept.

"I don't think he spent much time thinking about it," Armstrong said. "He did save all the items, so he obviously felt they were worth saving."

Armstrong, who lives in suburban Cincinnati, said his father did keep all of his "flown" items together.

Faced with the responsibility of conserving, preserving and insuring irreplaceable items and honoring their father's legacy, Armstrong and his brother, Rick, found that some things needed restoration, and that some required research to be properly identified.

"We felt like the number of people that could help us identify them and give us the historical context was diminishing and that the problem of understanding that context would only get worse over time," he said.

The Armstrongs turned to Sarasota, Florida-based Collectibles Authentication Guaranty for help with preserving and authenticating the artifacts and memorabilia and chose Heritage Auctions for the sales.

Greg Rohan, president of Heritage Auctions, said it handles numerous categories of collectibles that appeal to various collectors, but items connected with space seem to have a universal appeal.

"Space is one of the very, very few categories that every single person seems to be interested in," Rohan said. "You show somebody something from the space program, and they are fascinated by it."

Bids can be taken online, by phone or in person.

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World

The Latest: Merkel responds to Trump jab on Montenegro

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The Latest: Merkel responds to Trump jab on Montenegro

The Associated Press
Russian Vladimir Putin speaks during a meeting with Russian ambassadors to foreign countries in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, July 19, 2018. Putin says his first summit with U.S. President Donald Trump was "successful" and is accusing Trump's opponents in the U.S. of hampering any progress on the issues they discussed. (Sergei Karpukhin/Pool Photo via AP)

The Latest on the meeting earlier this week between Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Donald Trump (all times local):

2 p.m.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel says NATO's collective-defense clause applies to all members, not just big countries, adding that she's glad to have Montenegro in the alliance.

Earlier this week, President Donald Trump said the tiny Balkan country's membership in the alliance means Montenegro's "very aggressive people" could start World War III because of NATO's mutual defense pact. The interview was conducted after Trump met Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Merkel told a news conference Friday that the alliance's so-called Article 5 promising mutual defense is "a central element of NATO, and I believe this Article 5 valid for all NATO member states, not just for big ones or small ones or for some."

She added that Montenegro, a former Yugoslav republic, made great efforts to become a member and added: "I am glad that Montenegro is a member."

———

1:25 p.m.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel says that meetings between U.S. and Russian presidents should become "normal" again.

Merkel's comments Friday came after President Donald Trump invited Russian President Vladimir Putin to the White House. Earlier this week, the two had a meeting in Finland.

Merkel said that "in principle it's always good for everyone when there are talks, particularly when there are talks between these two countries."

She said: "I think it must once again become normal for Russian and American presidents to meet."

———

11:45 a.m.

The Russian government is pushing for the release of a gun rights activist accused of being a covert agent in the U.S., calling her arrest a "farce."

The Russian ambassador to the U.S., Anatoly Antonov, told a conference in Moscow that the accusations against Maria Butina are groundless and that American authorities tried to "break her" and refused her consular visits for the first few days after her arrest.

Russian Embassy representatives visited Butina in Washington on Thursday, and said in a statement that she is in good health but "has difficulties in adapting to prison conditions."

Antonov said Moscow is working to return her to Russia. The Russian Foreign Ministry started an online campaign to "Free Maria Butina."

U.S. federal prosecutors accused Butina this week of being a covert Russian agent and working to infiltrate U.S. political organizations, including the National Rifle Association, before and after Donald Trump's election as president.

Butina, 29, denies wrongdoing.

———

11:30 a.m.

Russia's ambassador to the United States says that Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Donald Trump discussed a possible referendum in eastern Ukraine.

Anatoly Antonov told a conference in Moscow that "this issue was discussed" and that Putin made "concrete proposals" to Trump on finding solutions to the Ukraine conflict. Antonov would not give further details of what was discussed at the Helsinki summit about Ukraine.

Trump tweeted that the two men discussed Ukraine but has not mentioned a referendum or revealed specifics of the Ukraine discussions.

The U.S. and Russia have been on opposing sides of the conflict in Ukraine, unleashed after a popular uprising against a pro-Russian president and Russia's annexation of Crimea in 2014.

Ukraine and European powers are unlikely to support a referendum in the Donbass region, where pro-Russian separatists hold sway.

———

11:15 a.m.

Russia's ambassador to the U.S. says Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump should continue to have direct contact after their summit this week.

Speaking Friday in Moscow, Anatoly Antonov did not directly respond to Trump's proposal to invite Putin to Washington later this year.

He called Monday's summit in Helsinki a "key event" in international politics and laughed off suggestions that the two men made any "secret deals."

Concerns have been raised in the U.S. about what the two presidents discussed at their meeting. Limited details have emerged, but Antonov said discussions included ways to cooperate on arms control and Iran's nuclear activities. He said Russian diplomats will work with American counterparts to "fulfill the agreements reached."

He also reiterated denials of Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

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Lifestyle

How To Forgive Someone : 5 Practices To Let Go Of Anger

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A famous quote from the English poet says that “to err is human, to forgive divine.” Everyone makes mistakes, but few people possess the emotional maturity to not people’s mistakes against them. It can often be easier to hold onto grudges than to forgive.

However, holding onto anger just lets us become even more consumed by it. No reasonable person would say that they want to be angry, but so many are happy to let negative feelings grow inside them.

If you want to learn how to forgive someone, this guide will help you out.

1. Consider the size of their offense

Not all wrongdoings are made alike. Some acts are so heinous they might be all but impossible to forgive. However, most are small enough that they can and should be forgiven. It might not be an immediate forgiveness, but that doesn’t mean they have to live inside you forever. Even if something seems like a huge offense to you, it’s very likely that it doesn’t matter in the grand scheme of things.

When someone has caused you harm, take a moment to think about what it really means. What has their offense deprived you of? Is it something that you can never get back? Did they hurt you or did your interpretation of their action cause you the most harm? Is this problem still affecting you, or are you just letting it affect it?

2. Ask yourself if you want to be angry

When learning how to forgive someone, you need to look inward. Consider your anger and think about all the pain it’s causing you. Take a moment to consider if this is something you want. It’s possible that you’ve become so used to anger that you’re afraid of letting go of it. However, that doesn’t mean it’s actually doing you any good.

As your rage courses through you, take a moment to step back and think about if it has any worth to you. There’s nothing wrong with feeling angry when someone hurts you, but when the moment has long passed, it only becomes a burden that makes you feel worse without any sort of personal growth.

3. Meditation

Anger can cause us to fear our thoughts and believe that we have no control over them. In a way, we don’t. Our thoughts and feelings can come up without warning and cause us tremendous pain. We can reduce their power through the awareness that meditation allows us.

When you meditate, you don’t try to push your problems away. Doing so would only be counterintuitive. It involves observing your thoughts as you would observe a passing car. As you breathe and out, you can remember that your thoughts and feelings do not define you. Should your anger be triggered, you can distance it from your essence instead of letting it consume you.

4. Accept your anger

Anger doesn’t always start and end with the triggering situation. What often happens is that we get angry at someone for hurting us. Then, we get angry at ourselves for being angry. This leads to further frustration as we don’t know how to stop our anger from getting bigger and bigger.

An easy solution is to just accept that you are angry. You won’t be angry forever (hopefully), but you are angry at the moment. Emotions are temporary and you can reduce their power by letting them be in the moment. You can let anger pass like water through a drain by accepting it.

5. Talk to the other person

You might want to do anything but talk to the person who hurt you, but if you want to learn how to forgive someone, you need to have the maturity to face them. Forgiveness through avoidance can be much more difficult to achieve.

When you let yourself see the other person, you remember that they are a human. They might have caused you harm, but they are capable of empathy just like anyone else. You should let them know exactly how you feel about what they did. They might not realize how much harm they caused to you and feel genuine remorse. Remember to accept their apology and move on. Research suggests that forgiveness is good for us.

Pride can keep us from knowing how to forgive someone, even if we understand how it would benefit us. When we make the decision to forgive someone, we free ourselves of a tremendous burden. We no longer have to go through life with the curse of unhelpful anger looming over us.

If you want to learn how to forgive someone, you just need to remember what your values are. Do you want to be someone who is mature and understanding or someone who lets their mind be poisoned by the actions of others. We think we know the answer.

(C)Power of Positivity, LLC. All rights reserved

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Technology

Oregon wheat farmers try to stop fire that’s consuming crops

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Oregon wheat farmers try to stop fire that's consuming crops

The Associated Press
In this Tuesday, July 17, 2018 photo, Deidre Mallgren, left, hoses down the roof of her friend at right, Lindsey Bennett's home as helicopters attack a fast moving wildfire, in Spokane Valley, Wash. (Tyler Tjomsland /The Spokesman-Review via AP)

Farmers rushed to save their livelihoods as a wildfire roared through vast Oregon wheat fields Thursday and crushed their hopes at the peak of what was expected to be one of the most bountiful harvests in years.

Farmers used water tanks on the backs of pickup trucks and tractors to battle flames whipping across fields for the third straight day. One man was found dead near his charred tractor Wednesday, apparently overrun as he tried to clear a strip of land to protect a neighbor's property.

Farmers who grow tens of thousands of acres of soft, white wheat typically bound for Asia said they are confronting walls of fire up to 30 feet (9 meters) high and wind so strong that it tosses embers ahead of the fire's leading edge. The conditions threaten farmers working to stop the blaze from reaching the wheat.

"It's been day after day after day of pretty horrendous winds and then the fire creates its own wind," Alan von Borstel, who has battled the flames with his son, said by phone. "As the fire gets closer, you actually start to feel threatened, and if it gets too close, we realize we can't do it, (and) we get the hell out of Dodge."

Wheat farmers like von Borstel always have water tanks loaded on the back of trucks during the hot, dry summers. When a fire breaks out, they race to the scene alongside professional fire crews. If they have time, the farmers mow down standing wheat to slow the fire's progress and come behind firetrucks to tamp down flames with their water.

But their most important job is called "disking." They use a tractor attachment to till the wheat into the soil, creating a gap up to 150 feet (46 meters) wide between the advancing flames and the rest of the field. That gives firefighters a chance to get ahead of the blaze.

"Without the help of the farmers, this thing wouldn't get stopped," von Borstel said. "There are lots of us out there. We look out for each other."

Von Borstel's crops so far are untouched, but his cousin lost just over a square mile on Wednesday and the fire is just a few miles from his home.

The blaze about 85 miles (137 kilometers) east of Portland has scorched nearly 80 square miles (207 square kilometers) of wheat fields and grasslands since igniting Tuesday.

It was the largest of more than 200 wildfires across Oregon, many sparked by lightning. Other fires dotted states throughout the drought-stricken Western United States.

A man's body was found Thursday near a homeless camp inside the perimeter of another fire that burned earlier in the week in southwestern Oregon. It wasn't clear if he died before or during the blaze, and an autopsy was planned.

In wheat country, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said the fire may have been intentionally set and the state will help investigate. Firefighters were trying to protect homes and other structures in the hardest-hit areas.

Authorities have told residents of 900 houses to evacuate or be ready to go as the flames spread rapidly.

The wheat at risk isn't good for making bread and is primarily shipped to Asian markets — particularly Japan and Korea — for use in ramen noodles, steamed breads and flatbreads.

The crop this year looked particularly bountiful, with farmers estimating they might get 15 or 20 bushels more per acre than the average 55. The wheat would normally be harvested within the next 10 days.

Each crop takes two years to grow because farmers leave half the land fallow to improve environmental conditions and reduce erosion.

"There's some years when you wouldn't mind your wheat crop burning, but this isn't one of them. I don't know how much crop has burned and it's still burning," said Tom McCoy, who lost 300 acres overnight.

He estimates the lost value at about $91,000. He's insured, but this year's crop looked so good he worries he might not have had enough insurance and will still wind up with less than he would have gotten on the market.

"There has been tens of thousands of acres of cropland lost," said Logan Padget, a fifth-generation wheat farmer who was battling the flames Thursday.

"I've heard that some people have lost literally everything. … You've got two years' worth of effort that's coming down to a two-week harvest, and all your time and care and effort for the land is wasted."

———

Associated Press writer Steven DuBois in Portland contributed to this report.

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Follow Gillian Flaccus on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/gflaccus

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World

Olympic figure skater stabbed to death

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Olympic figure skater stabbed to death in Kazakhstan

PlayPierre Albouy/Reuters, FILE

WATCH Non-Stop Drama in Men's Figure Skating

Olympic figure skater Denis Ten was stabbed to death during an attempted robbery in Kazakhstan Thursday, local media reported.

Ten, who was 25, was stabbed by two men trying to steal a mirror from his car on Thursday afternoon in Almaty, local news agency KazInform reported, citing a ministry of healthcare official.

Ten was rushed to the hospital after the attack around 3 p.m. and died almost three hours later, according to KazInform. Authorities said they would thoroughly investigate the knife attack, the outlet reported.

Ten had won a bronze medal for individual men's figure skating in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

PHOTO: Denis Ten of Kazakhstan, bronze medalist in mens singles figure skating of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, attends a news conference in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 9, 2015. Pierre Albouy/Reuters, FILE
Denis Ten of Kazakhstan, bronze medalist in men's singles figure skating of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, attends a news conference in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 9, 2015.

He was the first figure skater to win a medal for Kazakhstan, according to the Associated Press.

Fellow Olympic medalist figure skater Adam Rippon said his “skating friend” Ten was “so kind to everyone and a huge inspiration to me and so many other people.”

“Denis, thank you for showing us how to be a champion,” Rippon wrote on Twitter Thursday. “Your time with us was way too short. Love you forever.”

My skating friend, @Tenis_Den, passed away today. He was so kind to everyone and a huge inspiration to me and so many other people. Murdered in the streets of Kazakhstan. Denis, thank you for showing us how to be a champion. Your time with us was way too short. Love you forever.

— Adam Rippon (@Adaripp) July 19, 2018

“Denis Ten was a great athlete and a great ambassador for his sport,” Thomas Bach, the president of the International Olympic Committee, said in a statement on Twitter Thursday. “A warm personality and a charming man. Such a tragedy to lose him at such a young age.”

“Denis Ten was a great athlete and a great ambassador for his sport. A warm personality and a charming man. Such a tragedy to lose him at such a young age.” -IOC President Thomas Bach pic.twitter.com/YIZhBHy6Fi

— Olympics (@Olympics) July 19, 2018

The International Skating Union tweeted it was “deeply saddened by the news.”

PHOTO: Denis Ten, of Kazakhstan, skates his free program at the Rostelekom Cup ISU Grand Prix figure skating event in Moscow, Oct. 21, 2017.Ivan Sekretarev/AP, FILE
Denis Ten, of Kazakhstan, skates his free program at the Rostelekom Cup ISU Grand Prix figure skating event in Moscow, Oct. 21, 2017.

“Our heartfelt condolences go out to Denis' family, friends and fans across the world,” the ISU wrote on Twitter.

The ISU is deeply saddened by the news from media in Kazakhstan announcing the passing of Figure Skater Denis Ten. Our heartfelt condolences go out to Denis' family, friends and fans across the world. pic.twitter.com/1w7Isb9HJC

— ISU Figure Skating (@ISU_Figure) July 19, 2018

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